Newly constructed Biobulk waste water treatment plant in South Africa to be commissioned

Newly constructed Biobulk waste water treatment plant in South Africa to be commissioned

Commissioning of South Africa’s first Biobulk waste water treatment plant in South Africa will take place in March 2016.

Veolia Water Technologies South Africa was awarded a contract to design, construct and operate the construction plant.

The waste water treatment plant in South Africa which is owned by Distell is aimed at being an anaerobic water treatment facility which will help lower the chemical oxygen demand load in the municipality while at the same time the whole cost of effluent treatment.

The constructed plant will use the continuous stirred tank reactor, a green technology which is robust and a proven process for treating waste water with significant amounts of suspended solids.

The Biobulk can be operated as a once through system or it can be returned after the clarification stage.

According to the Industrial technical Manger of Veolia Water Technologies, Jaco Oosthuizen, the biobulk system will help in the long term capital savings investment in the sense that instead of solids being removed from the system, they are converted into biogas which is used as renewable energy in the site.

Oosthuizen also noted that the water in the plant will be treated using clarifiers, centrifuge, boiler and a biogas flare where by the digester will reduce waste matter by 94.1 percent before the clarifier removes the suspended solids the water goes to the Veolia HydroTech drum filter for tertiary treatment.

When commissioned, the plant construction in south Africa will be handed over to Veolia’s Western Cape operations and maintenance division who will ensure that operations and maintenance of the facility is catered for ten years.

Oosthuizen further noted that Distell will pay the monthly set fee for water treatment as per the contract while Veolia will finance it.

Through this water treatment plant in South Africa, Veolia will treat 1000m3 of waste water daily with 8.6 t of organic load. The treated water will then be discharged to the municipal waste water works.

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