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Mozambique LNG project timeline and all you need to know

The Mozambique LNG project comprises the Golfinho-Atum gas field development in the offshore Area 1 Block of the deep-water Rovuma Basin and the construction of a 12.88 million tonnes per annum (Mtpa) onshore liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility on the Cabo Delgado coast of Mozambique. This will be the first onshore LNG facility in Mozambique.

Area 1 Mozambique LNG facility

The Golfinho and Atum gas fields are located in 1,600m-deep waters within the Rovuma Basin Area 1, approximately 40km off the coast of Cabo Delgado. The Offshore Area-1 is estimated to contain 75 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of recoverable natural gas resources.

The LNG processing and export facility will be developed in the Afungi peninsula in Cabo Delgado, the northernmost province of Mozambique.

The Area 1 Mozambique LNG facility will consist of two liquefaction trains with a combined nameplate capacity of 12.88Mtpa in the initial phase. It will also house gas pre-treatment facilities and full-containment LNG storage tanks. The LNG production capacity of the facility is proposed to be further expanded up to 50Mtpa in future.

The plant will receive feed gas supply from the Golfinho-Atum gas field through pipeline and produce LNG for export to the Asian and European markets, as well as for domestic consumption in Mozambique.

Other support facilities for the LNG plant will include materials offloading facility and an LNG marine terminal capable of accommodating large LNG carriers, which will also be shared with upcoming Area 4 LNG projects.

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Project timeline

2011-2014

The environmental impact assessment (EIA) for the Area 1 Mozambique LNG project was carried out.

The Mozambican Ministry of Coordination of Environmental Affairs (MICOA) approved the EIA report in June 2014.

2017

The concessions to design, build and operate the marine facilities for the project were secured from the Government of Mozambique in July 2017.

2018

The Government of Mozambique gave the final approval for the Area 1 Mozambique LNG development plan in March 2018.

2019

The final investment decision (FID) on the Mozambique LNG project, which is estimated to cost approximately US $20bn, was taken in June 2019. Construction works on the integrated LNG project were started in August 2019. The start of production is scheduled for 2024.

2020

The African Development Bank (AfDB) concludes its bid to co-finance the construction of Mozambique’s integrated Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) plant by signing a senior loan of US $400m for the project.

In August, the government of Mozambique signed a security pact with Total to support the development of the US $20bn Mozambique LNG project amid an insurgency linked to Islamic State.

According to the pact, a joint task force will ensure the security of Mozambique LNG project activities in the Afungi site, and across the broader area of project operations. Mozambique LNG will provide logistic support to the joint task force which will ensure human rights principles are respected.

In September, the US through the International Development Finance Corporation (DFC) agreed to provide up to US $1.5bn in political risk insurance to support the commercialization of natural gas reserves in Mozambique’s Rovuma basin; a region ravaged by an Islamist insurgency for the past three years.

The insurance is to cover the construction and operation of an onshore natural gas liquefaction plant and support facilities being developed by energy giants including American firm ExxonMobil, French’s Total and Italian’s Eni.

In mid-September, Total CEO Patrick Pouyanné and Mozambican president Filipe Nyusi met to discuss an intensifying Islamic State-linked insurgency in the country’s north, where the project is located. The violence is now creeping towards the project; recent videos that appear to show abuses, including torture and executions of civilians, by Mozambique’s army suggest the Cabo Delgado province has become increasingly lawless.

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