Danish development agency boosts major water project in Uganda

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GUELPH, ON. March 18, 2009 - Tap water. (Guelph Mercury/Ryan Pfeiffer) SEE STORY BY: NICOLE

The Danish government, through its development agency Danida, has offered Euro 100 million to boost a major water project in Uganda.

The project aims at offering to clean water to one million residents in parts of Kampala, Entebbe and Wakiso in the country.

This multi-billion dollar water water project in Uganda was signed recently in Kampala between Morgens Pedersen, the Danish Ambassador to Uganda and the managing director of National Water and Sewerage Corporation (NWSC), Eng Silver Mugisha which is also the implementer of the project.

Under the water project, a new plant for treating water will be built along the shores of Lake Victoria at Kigo, to enhance piped water supply to southern parts of Kampala, which covers Kajjansi, Kaazi, Entebbe, Bulenga, Buloba and Mpigi areas. Several sections of these areas are fall under the “dry zones” because they don’t get regular water supply.

A faecal sludge treatment plant will also be built to step up sanitation and waste management in those places. The feasibility study of the project will be done immediately while construction works are scheduled to kick off in 2019 and end by 2020.

In a statement after the signing ceremony that took place at the NWSC’s International Resource Centre in Bugolobi, Mugisha said the project is expected to increase the Kampala-Entebbe corridor water supply by 130 million litres daily.

At the moment, the corridor draws water from greater Kampala area’s daily water supply of 230 million litres, which Mugisha said is very little for the growing demand.

NWSC also plans to establish water supply in the greater Kampala to supply 400 million litres per day once works on Katosi treatment plant are complete by 2018.

Mugisha further assured Ambassador Pedersen of full value for money. He added that NWSC has already established a proven record in implementation of such such multibillion donor-funded projects.

“There is going to be a lot of integrity from us as an implementing agency,” said Mugisha, who has supervised similar projects funded by the European Union in Namasuba, Ggaba and other parts of the country.

 

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