Côte d’Ivoire embarks on installation of water treatment units in 32 of her towns

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The government of the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire has begun the installation of approximately 40 water treatment units in about 32 of her towns in a bid to alleviate drinking water shortages in the West African country.

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The project has already broke grounds in Dabakala, a town in Hambol Region on the North East side of the country, where several degremont®compact units (UCD), also known as prefabricated water purification units with a capacity of 100 m3/hour have been installed.

This will increase the production capacity of drinking water in Dabakala from 660 m3/day to 2,660 m3/day and considerably help to improve the drinking water supply to Dabakala, Katiola, Niakara, Boundiali, and Tengrela towns.

Designed and manufactured by French-based Suez Water technologies & solutions and installed by Franzetti Côte d’Ivoire, the drinking water treatment units according to Laurent Tchagba, the country’s minister for Hydraulics, “will serve as a temporary solution to the problem of the severe and chronic shortage of drinking water, which several localities in the country are facing, pending the implementation of a definite solution”.

The entire project is expected to be complete by the end of September this year at a cost of approximately 600,649 euros.

Water for all program

This project is a part of the “water for all program” which was launched back in 2017 with an aim of enabling the entire population of the West African country to have access to clean drinking water by 2030.

Several projects have already been implemented under this program including the construction of the drinking water plant in Tiassalé, which is expected to boost the drinking water supply to three of the country’s towns, namely N’Douci, N’Zianouan, and Tiassalé.

Recently the government also launched another project in Bouaké, which is expected to complete within a period of 18 months, thanks to the “water for all program”.

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